Canon EF 24-70mm f/4 L IS USM Lens

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Key Features

  • 24-70mm focal length
  • 38.4-112mm equivalent focal length on Canon APS-C cameras
  • F4.0 constant maximum aperture; F22 minimum
  • Ring-type ultrasonic-type AF motor with full-time manual focusing
  • Image stabilization
  • 77mm filters
  • 0.38m/14.96" minimum focus
  • Canon EF mount for full frame, APS-H and APS-C DSLRs

Product Description

The EF 24-70mm f/4L IS USM is a relatively compact standard zoom in Canon's premium 'L' series. It's primarily designed for full frame cameras such as the EOS 6D, but also works on APS-C. It includes a macro mode offering up to 0.7x magnification, complemented by Canon's 'Hybrid IS' that's specifically designed to give better performance for close-up work than conventional IS systems. The lens is dust- and splash-resistant, including a rubber seal around the mount, and incorporates a ring-type ultrasonic motor for fast, silent autofocusing.

Questions & Answers

QUESTION

Perfect Range for Weddings

I wanted to get some other opinions but it seems to me that I would only need 2 lenses to cover the perfect range for wedding photography. I'm looking at the 24-70mm and 70-200mm and this is for my 1.6x crop T4i/650D. I don't plan to get a FF body anytime soon because I want to save up for the lenses first. I also plan to pair this with a 430EX II so I dont have to worry about the f/4 vs f/2.8... So I guess my question is "Is this a sufficient for beginner event/wedding photography? Am I missing anything?" I appreciate any and all advice!

bokehburger asked
9 months ago

ANSWERS

Canon 15-85 mm maybe? That is if you decide to remain on a crop body. Paired with a 70-200 or 70-300. 24 mm on a crop body is not wide enough. I would go either with the 10-22 paired with the 24-70 or the 15-85mm. You can also take a look at the 24-105mm f4. I prefer it to the 24-70 as a zoom lens ( on a FF body) because of the range. But you might find 70mm on crop long enough. I use the wide angles a lot in weddings. Also I use primes for candid shots: 50mm f1.4, 85 mm f1.8 and now looking to buy the 135mm f2 also. What you will also need is lights. I use 2-4 430ex flashes paired with wireless transmitters. I am looking to upgrade to the new 600 ex system so if you are now doing your investment look into it. Normally you can get away with not very bright lens if you use multiple flashes. But be aware that for a crop body the candid look is almos imposible to aquire with a f4 lens. So you will need primes. Rent some gear in the begining and see what suits you. Good luck. Continue Reading

Muresan Bogdan answered
9 months ago

bokehburger wrote: I wanted to get some other opinions but it seems to me that I would only need 2 lenses to cover the perfect range for wedding photography. I'm looking at the 24-70mm and 70-200mm and this is for my 1.6x crop T4i/650D. I don't plan to get a FF body anytime soon because I want to save up for the lenses first. I also plan to pair this with a 430EX II so I dont have to worry about the f/4 vs f/2.8... So I guess my question is "Is this a sufficient for beginner event/wedding photography? Am I missing anything?" I appreciate any and all advice! +1 to others that 24mm is not wide enough on 1.6x crop bodies.  You'll want to cover 17mm-20mm for group/family shots.  Maybe even wider for interior/exterior location shots. Since you're not going full frame, don't handicap yourself with full frame lenses like the 24-70L or 17-40/4L:    Choose one of the 17-50ish f/2.8 zooms (EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM, Sigma 17-50 f/2.8 EX DC OS HSM, Tamron 17-50 f/2.8 XR Di II VC) or even the ... Continue Reading

Lemming51 answered
9 months ago

I could be a mistake to buy expensive full frame lenses that are too long on your current camera. You could buy the lenses you need now and then sell them when you buy a full frame camera. Used lenses in high demand can be sold for a large percentage of their original price. If you buy used and then sell, the cost of owning lenses can be very low. Continue Reading

sssanti answered
9 months ago

QUESTION

Looking to upgrade to L Glass

Hi, I'm interested in what lens I should buy next. I'm looking into L glass, but also kind of a budget. I kind of have a more photojournalistic style, and I vary from portraits to landscapes, a good zoom with a constant aperture of at least 4 or 2.8 would be the best. I've been looking at the 24-105, 17-40, 16-35 (pricey), 24-70 or a 70-200 (Debating IS or non IS, since I found myself doing sports photography indoors). I've looked around on Amazon, BHPhotoVideo, and even Craigslist to just look at prices. The 24-105 seems to be the most popular L glass, only because it's easier to find online for sale, which I've seen go from $700-$900. Not bad. The 17-40 I've seen up for sale went from $550- $800, which is good too. The 16-35 is $1300+ so that's out of the picture for me, same as the 24-70. The 70-200 f4 non IS, is around $400-600, with IS, around $900, f2.8 is around $900, and 2.8 with IS is $1000+. I definitely need the IS, but the aperture of 2.8 sounds nice too. Trying to keep ...

droberto asked
11 months ago

ANSWERS

Briefly, I had many Canon systems before a used 5D with L zooms.  Getting older and with bad knees, last year I sold all Canon stuff and bought a Samsung NX20 system.  It was, indeed, lighter, easier to carry, and had plenty-good IQ, but the body turned out to be too small.  So I'm back to Canon. I bought a 6D kit with the 24-105, the lens I had and loved with the 5D, and I still love that.  Here's a landscape I shot with that at 24mm Sunday. [URL=http://s89.photobucket.com/user/jeffreybehr/media/Landscapes/2013Apr28_TortillaCreek_1200w_zpseddc7641.jpg.html][IMG]http://i89.photobucket.com/albums/k220/jeffreybehr/Landscapes/2013Apr28_TortillaCreek_1200w_zpseddc7641.jpg[/IMG][/URL] After looking at hundreds of images shot with 17-40s here... http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=1251516 ...I bought a used 17-40 and am pleased with it.  With a new knee and a little inspiration, I'm carrying all this, including a 70-200/F4/L/IS easily.  The 6D's excellent low-light, ... Continue Reading

Jeffrey Behr answered
11 months ago

Assuming you are moving to FF otherwise it doesn't make much sense.  You can start with 24-105L, 70-200L/4.0 IS and 17-40L, so-called the trilogy of three F/4 zoom.  It's what I started with 5Dc years ago after I moved from Nikon D50.  24-105L stayed with camera most times, followed up by 70-200L/4.0 IS and 17-40L.  70-200L/4.0 IS works on APS-C bodies quite well as well. Continue Reading

qianp2k answered
11 months ago

The L series lenses are designed for FF sensors and you'll get more useful focal lengths if you're using them on a FF body.  Saying that, there are some great L series lenses out there for crop sensor cameras, particularly in the telephoto range.  The problem is that many of the general purpose zoom lenses, won't give you a focal length that you're used to on a crop sensor. If you want to go for L series lenses, perhaps start with a telephoto.  The 70-200 F4 IS is a great lens and work as a 112-320 lens on your crop sensor. Several people have identified the 24-105 L series as a great lens, and it would easily be my recommendation if you want a good value general purpose lens.  It's relatively cheap because it's usually sold as a kit lens and there will be plenty of second hand lenses around.  However, another consideration, is waiting until you upgrade your body to a 5D II or if buying new, a 6D and get the 24-105 F4 L with the new body.  At least that way you get a bit more ... Continue Reading

RichardOz answered
11 months ago

QUESTION

Canon EF 24-70mm F4 IS USM

Canon "Introduced" the Canon EF 24-70mm F4 IS USM Nov 5, 2012. When did it become available to purchase in USA, Canada?

triplejck asked
9 months ago

ANSWERS

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Warranty Information

"A Product, when delivered to you in new condition in its original container, is warranted against defects in materials or workmanship as follows: for a period of one (1) year from the date of original purchase, defective parts or a defective Product returned to Canon, or its authorized service providers, and proven to be defective upon inspection, will be repaired with new or comparable rebuilt parts or exchanged for a refurbished Product, as determined by Canon or the authorized service provider n their sole discretion. Replaced parts and exchanged Products will become the property of Canon."

Go to Canon USA's warranty page for more information. DPReview GearShop is an authorized Canon dealer in the United States.

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