Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM Lens

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Key Features

  • 55-250mm focal length
  • 88-400mm equivalent focal length on Canon APS-C cameras
  • F4-5.6 maximum aperture; F22-32 minimum
  • Stepper-motor-type AF motor without full-time manual focusing
  • Image stabilization, 3.5 stops (CIPA)
  • 58mm filters
  • 0.85m/2.79' minimum focus
  • Canon EF-S mount for APS-C DSLRs

Product Description

The compact and affordable EF-S 55-250mm F4-5.6 IS STM offers powerful telephoto performance on Canon's APS-C DSLRs. Offering an equivalent focal range of 90-400mm it is equipped with a 3.5-stop Image Stabilizer with automatic panning detection. Built around a linear stepper motor, the focus is quiet during video shooting.

Specs

Principal specifications
Lens type Zoom lens
Max Format size APS-C / DX
Focal length 55–250 mm
Image stabilisation Yes (4 stops)
Lens mount Canon EF-S
Aperture
Maximum aperture F4.0 - F5.6
Minimum aperture F22.0 - F32.0
Aperture ring No
Number of diaphragm blades 7
Aperture notes Circular diaphragm
Optics
Elements 15
Groups 12
Special elements / coatings UD element
Focus
Minimum focus 0.85 m (33.46)
Autofocus Yes
Motor type Stepper motor
Full time manual Yes
Focus method Internal
Distance scale No
DoF scale No
Physical
Weight 375 g (0.83 lb)
Diameter 70 mm (2.76)
Length 111 mm (4.37)
Materials Plastic barrel, plastic mount
Sealing No
Colour Black
Zoom method Rotary (extending)
Power zoom No
Zoom lock No
Filter thread 58 mm
Hood supplied No
Tripod collar No
Other
Notes With automatic panning detection

Reviews

User Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
  • fastHID, Mar 30, 2014 GMT:
    Canon EF-S 55-250mm F/4-5.6 IS STM

    got this lens thinking Canon usually makes small improvements with each newer version, got it at a healthy discount when buying a new 70D from BH Photo and am very impressed and pleased with it. much greater sharpness and clarity than non-STM version, it is like a completely different lens. have only done stills so far, no video, but am very happy with the clear, sharp image results.

    Continue Reading

  • Pritzl, Apr 8, 2014 GMT:
    EF-S 55-250 STM; worth the upgrade?

    I recently purchased this lens as an upgrade to my 55-250 version I. I suspect there may be others weighing a similar decision given how popular this lens line is as a small, light, decent quality telephoto. Hopefully some of you will find this evaluation useful. So, how much of an improvement is it? Build quality is significantly better. Even though it's supposedly lighter by a few grams, the new version feels denser somehow. There is no play at all and the focus/zoom rings are smoother in ...

    Continue Reading

Questions & Answers

QUESTION

Difference between Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS and IS II

Hello there, Recently I've bought a Canon 650D with a start kit lens EF-S 18-55 IS II. I'm looking for a Telelens for in the near future and these are the ones I found: Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS €285 Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS II €149 Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS STM €279 But does any know the difference between IS and IS II or should I just go for the STM ? I mainly use it for taking picture, but I might record some video's as well.

Revlite asked
9 months ago

ANSWERS

The only difference between these two 55-250mm lenses are the finish. Optically and mechanically they are the same, just like EF-S 18-55 IS and 18-55 IS II. The STM is best suited for video because its motor is very quiet. However, the price for IS II is really tempting. No point in getting the original IS version for the prices you quoted. Sorry to say, but what downright sucks is not OP's 18-55 but your advice.While old EF-S 18-55 non-image stabilized lenses were pretty unimpressive, Canon improved the series a lot when they added IS, and after that point they are generally thought of as excellent value. Kind regards, - Henrik Continue Reading

Henrik Herranen answered
9 months ago

1 & 2 the same. 3 The STM version is optically a bit better, the front element does not rotate, and it's STM focus drive is faster and more quiet. The STM is of course a real advantage when taking movies with the new bodies that allow continuous AF during video. Continue Reading

photonius answered
9 months ago

I was lucky and had an outstanding original 18-55 kit lens (non-IS). Produced great pics... http://www.dpreview.com/forums/thread/2453407 Sold it with my 30D. Then I got the 18-55 IS (Mk I) with my 50D, and IQ was about the same as my original kit lens (still quite good). Sold that and went with the 18-55 IS II with my 650D, and IQ was a definite improvement.  Was extremely happy with that lens. Gave that one away with my 50D. Then picked up the 70D with 18-135 STM and IQ is on par with the 18-55 IS II that I had.  Focusing with the STM is simply outstanding and of course the AF noise is non-existent.  It's an excellent focal length range too. I also have the 55-250 IS II which is a nice lens, but would recommend the STM version if you can swing it. None of them compare to the L primes that I use for longer stuff though. R2 Continue Reading

R2D2 answered
9 months ago

QUESTION

Filters and filter holders for Canon 650D/T4i

I'd be really grateful if I could ask for some advice with filters and filter holders, please? Several years ago, I purchased a few Cokin P-series filters for a Panasonic DMC-FZ20 bridge camera. However, around two years ago, I purchased my very first DSLR, a Canon 650D/Rebel T4i. I've recently begun looking into purchasing an ND graduated filter, but at the same time, was hoping to begin using my old filters once again - in particular the circular polariser. As I've been reading around, I've read that Cokin perhaps isn't the best brand to go with for ND filters, with it perhaps not being a true ND filter and sometimes causing photographs to have a magenta hue. I'd seen many people recommending Hitech and in particular, LEE filters, which I'd love to go for - although it might possibly be a few months down the line. I do apologise if this is a silly question: I just wondered if, rather than having to buy a different filter holder for each brand, my existing Cokin P-Series filters ...

Matthew46 asked
2 months ago

ANSWERS

I have a set of 85mm Hitech filters that I use in a Cokin holder P series holder - I chose Hitech because of the magenta hue problem with Cokin that you mention.  Many people use Cokin holders because they are cheap and easily available. I get no vignetting on a an APS-C camera down to 17mm.  If you want to go wider than that Cokin does a "wide angle adapter" that only takes one filter but I am told that it is quite easy to saw off part of the arms at the side of the standard holder as well. I would start off with the Cokin filters that you have and see how they work.  If you want better filters I think that Hitech are adequate unless you get into semi professional photography. HDR has really obviated the need for ND graduated filters and if I were starting over now I wouldn't buy any Cokin type filters.  Circular filters that screw on to the front of the lens have the advantage that you can use them with a lens hood. Continue Reading

Chris R-UK answered
2 months ago

I'd suggest that, if you haven't done so already, post this in the Canon SLR Lens forum. There are several people there with extensive experience with rectangular filters and holders used with Canon lenses. Dave Continue Reading

dsjtecserv answered
2 months ago

You may be able to compensate for the Magenta use by using a custom or auto white balance. You are best off using a quality filter over a cheaper filter, but sometimes that isn't in the budget. When you are using filters, you should be aware of possible flare issues.  Digital cameras are more flare prone than film cameras.  Kit lenses tend to be more flare prone than pro level lenses.  Cheap filters are more flare prone than expensive filters.  You seem to have all three. Use a lens hood to keep stray light away from the filter.  When outdoors, if you don't have a lens hood, use black cardboard (or your hand) to shade the front of the lens. Avoid having light sources (or the sun) in, or near, the field of view. If you do find that you frequently use filters, you should think about high quality filters. When it comes to "protective" filters, do a web search before buying them.  There are strong differences of opinion on exactly how much protection they provide, and a wide range of ... Continue Reading

Michael Fryd answered
2 months ago

QUESTION

Filters and filter holders for Canon EF-S lenses

A few days ago, I posted a question about filter holders in the Beginners Questions forum, and a member suggested I might be best to post a copy in the Canon SLR Lens forum, too, as many members had a great deal of experience with rectangular filter and holders. I've copied my original post below - I'd be really grateful if I could ask for some advice with filters and filter holders for two Canon 58mm lenses, please? Several years ago, I purchased a few Cokin P-series filters for a Panasonic DMC-FZ20 bridge camera. However, around two years ago, I purchased my very first DSLR, a Canon 650D/Rebel T4i. I've recently begun looking into purchasing an ND graduated filter, but at the same time, was hoping to begin using my old filters once again - in particular the circular polariser. As I've been reading around, I've read that Cokin perhaps isn't the best brand to go with for ND filters, with it perhaps not being a true ND filter and sometimes causing photographs to have a magenta hue. ...

Matthew46 asked
2 months ago

ANSWERS

I'd use the Cokin system you already have.  I wouldn't shop for a new system unless you actually do suffer problems of vignetting and uncorrectable color casts. IMHO, YMMV Continue Reading

Lemming51 answered
2 months ago

i have the Lee filter holder kit and 4x4" and 4x6" GND and CPL filters. it doesn't get any better ;-) cheerz. Continue Reading

rebel99 answered
2 months ago

The P-series filter holder can take upto 82mm filter size lenses. It can not cause vignetting problems with your 18-55mm kitlens or 55-250mm IS STM lens, they simply are not seeing that wide. More problematic is the kitlens itself, it has a rotating front end during focussing, making it less ideal.  You might want to look into another lens in that does not have a rotating front element. Cheapest option is to get the new 18-55mm IS STM kit lens, of course. I am not sure how expensive a Cokin grad. ND filter will be. If it does not cost a lot, I suggest to first try one of those. If it does not meet your expectations, you can then always go for a new filter system, and sell the Cokin P-Series you have now including the new grad. ND filter. I can't give you more detailed advice as I have never used any such systems, nor any grad. ND filter. I only have a few "normal" screw on pol. filters (Toshiba, B&W, Marumi, Hama) and a Marumi ND8 filter for my 55mm f1.2. Continue Reading

brightcolours answered
2 months ago

Warranty Information

"A Product, when delivered to you in new condition in its original container, is warranted against defects in materials or workmanship as follows: for a period of one (1) year from the date of original purchase, defective parts or a defective Product returned to Canon, or its authorized service providers, and proven to be defective upon inspection, will be repaired with new or comparable rebuilt parts or exchanged for a refurbished Product, as determined by Canon or the authorized service provider n their sole discretion. Replaced parts and exchanged Products will become the property of Canon."

Go to Canon USA's warranty page for more information. DPReview GearShop is an authorized Canon dealer in the United States.

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