Canon TS-E 24mm f/3.5 L II Tilt-Shift Lens

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Gold Award
A unique lens, which has capabilities beyond anything else currently on the market. It's certainly an improvement on its predecessor, with better optics (especially in terms of chromatic aberration), improved build, and of course more flexible movements.”

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Key Features

  • 24mm focal length
  • 38.4mm equivalent focal length on Canon APS-C cameras
  • F3.5 maximum aperture; F22 minimum
  • Manual focus only
  • 82mm filters
  • 0.21m/8.27" minimum focus
  • Canon EF mount for full frame, APS-H and APS-C DSLRs

Product Description

Canon's update to its 24mm tilt-and-shift lens is a substantial improvement on its predecessor. Thanks to a new barrel design the tilt and shift axes can be freely rotated with respect to each other, which substantially increases the creative possibilities. Build quality is exemplary and the optics are superb, with essentially no distortion and minimal chromatic aberration. The only slight weakness is some softness towards the edge of the frame when the lens is used at more extreme shift positions; best results are obtained with the lens stopped down to F8 or smaller.

Reviews

User Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
  • Felipe Rodríguez, Nov 9, 2011 GMT:
    Best wide angle lens ever?

    Pros: Sharpness, overall image quality, lack of CA, extended shifting capabilities, build quality, design (it's nice!), independent shift/tilt Cons: None. Well, it is not exactly cheap... After using the 24 TS-E I, which is still a good lens, the Mark II will amaze you. Kudos for Canon engineering! As others have said, this may be, with ease, the best wide angle lens ever built by any brand for 35mm photography...

    Continue Reading

Questions & Answers

QUESTION

Will an Arca-type rail and clamp let me avoid parallax in shift-lens panos?

I am using the Canon 24mm TS-E on an EOS 6D for architectural photography, mounted on a Manfrotto Junior 410 geared head. I want to produce building interior panos avoiding the foreground parallax which makes it hard to stitch when you tripod-mount the body and shift left-right/up-down. As I understand it what I need to do is therefore keep the lens in the same position and move the back to reverse the effect of the lens movement. Hejnar Photo makes an Arca-type plate for the Manfrotto 410, onto which I could then fix a clamp and rail. Would this basic set-up give me the precision to keep the lens in exactly the same place for each exposure, or should I carry the extra weight, bulk and cost of a geared macro rail? To have the full range of shifted portrait and landscape, vertical and horizontal panos I was thinking of using an L-bracket, rotating the 410 head and its rail vertical to do vertical-shift panos in either format. Having never used Arca-type kit I am nervous just to order ...

4 months ago

ANSWERS

In fact, do I need a rail at all or would I have 24mm total lateral movement available for the L-bracket within the 82mm clamp offered here? http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Manfrotto-410-adapter-4-Kirk-Markins-Arca-Swiss-Wimberley-Acratech-foba-Benro-/231113164313?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item35cf6b0619 Three questions: 1) Would there be a danger of clumsily dropping the camera when vertical? 2) Would it be possible to make the movements sufficiently precise? 3) Have I completely misunderstood the system!? Thanks very much! Continue Reading

4 months ago

24mm movement is no problem, even with a short clamp. It is the plate that have to be long enough. You don't want to have the plate outside of the locking screw on the clamp. If you act clumsily, there offcourse will be a danger. But if you are a bit careful, there is no danger. Yes From what you have written, I think you have understood it. Continue Reading

afoton answered
4 months ago

Brilliant! Thank you. There's my Christmas list sorted. Continue Reading

4 months ago

QUESTION

TS-E on the cheap? For architectural photography

I shoot architecture, largely exteriors, for work but not for income. Mostly photos I only use at PowerPoint resolutions and for book/article illustrations. Really large prints are an occasional treat. I really want to move to a TS-E, firstly because I much prefer to compose and problem-solve in-camera rather than in PS, and secondly because I loved my old Nikon shift and want to play with tilt too. My question is, is it too bad a waste of a beautiful lens (17mm TS-E) to put it on a 7-year-old EOS400D? - Will I be able to focus through the 400D’s little view-finder? - Is the image quality in camera too low to be worth it? My alternative is to shell out another £1000+ to get the 6D and the 24mm TS-E instead (17mm on FF the angles are too un-natural-looking for my kind of architecture), and consign my EFS to spare. Any advice welcome! (If you want to see the sort of thing I shoot, there's some here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/barnabas_calder/ )

9 months ago

ANSWERS

My question is, is it too bad a waste of a beautiful lens (17mm TS-E) to put it on a 7-year-old EOS400D? - Will I be able to focus through the 400D’s little view-finder? - Is the image quality in camera too low to be worth it? I own both the 17 TSE and 24 TSE II and use them quite a lot Vs other lenses. I shot for several years using a older version of the TSE24 on a Canon 1DII. Despite the large viewfinder, I found it very difficult getting optimum tilt and shift adjustments using the viewfinder only. Tilt in particular was difficult, whereas sometime shift (perspective adjustments) could be done in the viewfinder by paying attention to larger items like trees, building columns, etc. With the Live View you can zoom into 5X or 10X, and with a higher resolution LCD , greatly facilitates Tilt and Shift lens movement adjustments. So my advice for T/S use is get a camera with a good Live View implementation and a good LCD. The 400D has a 2.5" LCD with only 230,000 dots, a very first ... Continue Reading

Mike K answered
9 months ago

AmateurArchitectural wrote: I shoot architecture, largely exteriors, for work but not for income. Mostly photos I only use at PowerPoint resolutions and for book/article illustrations. Really large prints are an occasional treat. I really want to move to a TS-E, firstly because I much prefer to compose and problem-solve in-camera rather than in PS, and secondly because I loved my old Nikon shift and want to play with tilt too. My question is, is it too bad a waste of a beautiful lens (17mm TS-E) to put it on a 7-year-old EOS400D? - Will I be able to focus through the 400D’s little view-finder? - Is the image quality in camera too low to be worth it? My alternative is to shell out another £1000+ to get the 6D and the 24mm TS-E instead (17mm on FF the angles are too un-natural-looking for my kind of architecture), and consign my EFS to spare. Any advice welcome! (If you want to see the sort of thing I shoot, there's some here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/barnabas_calder/ ) To me a ... Continue Reading

Dan_168 answered
9 months ago

AmateurArchitectural wrote: . . . My question is, is it too bad a waste of a beautiful lens (17mm TS-E) to put it on a 7-year-old EOS400D? Cameras really don't matter that much any more since a couple of years! It's the lenses that make the difference! Go for the TS-E 17 or 24 II and get a new camera when your old one stops to work properly. I own the TS-E 17 and it is a fabulous lens - just amazingly good and easily outperforming any other wide angle lens on the market - you can't go wrong with it. Camera bodies are widely overrated in terms of importance to the image quality. That said certain conditions require different feature sets - but for the sujets a TS-E 17 is built for a 400D will do just fine. The story is different for action and sports though. As long as you can stay at low ISO values you might not see a significant difference even to the latest camera releases from Canon Continue Reading

joger answered
9 months ago

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Warranty Information

"A Product, when delivered to you in new condition in its original container, is warranted against defects in materials or workmanship as follows: for a period of one (1) year from the date of original purchase, defective parts or a defective Product returned to Canon, or its authorized service providers, and proven to be defective upon inspection, will be repaired with new or comparable rebuilt parts or exchanged for a refurbished Product, as determined by Canon or the authorized service provider n their sole discretion. Replaced parts and exchanged Products will become the property of Canon."

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