Nikon D3300 DSLR Camera with Nikon AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR II Lens

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77% Silver Award
Some in-camera tools for creativity and processing are provided, but the D3300's real strength is high quality, high resolution images that will more than satisfy a beginner.”

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Key Features

  • 24.2 MP CMOS DX-format sensor
  • 5 frames per second continuous shooting
  • 11 AF points with 3D tracking
  • ISO 100-12800 (expandable to 25600)
  • 1080 (60, 50, 30, 25, 24 fps) HD video (MPEG-4/H.264/MOV)
  • 3 inch LCD with 921,000 dots
  • Expeed 4 processing
  • Easy panorama mode and beginner-friendly Guide mode
  • Wi-Fi enabled with WU-1a Wireless Adapter and compatible smartphone or tablet (not included)
  • SD/SDHC/SDXC memory

Product Description

The Nikon D3300 continues on the path of its entry-level DSLR predecessors, with plenty of built-in shooting and retouch modes, a small footprint, and beginner-friendly user interface. It has a 24.2 megapixel CMOS sensor with no optical low-pass filter, as well as an Expeed 4 image processor. The camera's ISO range tops out at 25,600 and continuous shooting up to 5 fps. The D3300 can also record 1080/60p full HD video. A newly redesigned collapsible, 18-55mm F3.5-5.6 VR II kit lens comes with the D3300. Optional wireless sharing to smartphones or tablets can be accomplished via Nikon's WU-1a module or an Eye-Fi SD card.

Specs

Body type
Body type Compact SLR
Sensor
Max resolution 6000 x 4000
Other resolutions 4512 x 3000, 3008 x 2000
Image ratio w:h 3:2
Effective pixels 24 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors 25 megapixels
Sensor size APS-C (23.5 x 15.6 mm)
Sensor type CMOS
Processor Expeed 4
Image
ISO Auto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800, 25600 (with boost)
White balance presets 12
Custom white balance Yes
Image stabilization No
Uncompressed format RAW
JPEG quality levels Fine, Normal, Basic
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Digital zoom No
Manual focus Yes
Number of focus points 11
Lens mount Nikon F
Focal length multiplier 1.5×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Fixed
Screen size 3
Screen dots 921,000
Touch screen No
Screen type TFT LCD (160 degree viewing angle)
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type Optical (pentamirror)
Viewfinder coverage 95%
Viewfinder magnification 0.85×
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 30 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/4000 sec
Aperture priority Yes
Shutter priority Yes
Manual exposure mode Yes
Subject / scene modes Yes
Built-in flash Yes (Pop-up)
Flash range 12.00 m (at ISO 100)
External flash Yes (via hot shoe or wireless)
Flash modes Auto, Auto slow sync, Auto slow sync with red-eye reduction, Auto with red-eye reduction, Fill-flash, Off, Rear-curtain sync, Rear-curtain with slow sync, Red-eye reduction, Red-eye reduction with slow sync, Slow sync
Continuous drive 5.0 fps
Self-timer Yes (2, 5, 10, 20 secs (1-9 exposures))
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot AF-area
Exposure compensation ±5 (at 1/3 EV steps)
WB Bracketing No
Videography features
Resolutions 1920 x 1080 (60, 50, 30, 25, 24 fps), 1280 x 720 (60, 50 fps), 640 x 424 (30, 25 fps)
Format MPEG-4, H.264
Microphone Mono
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types SD/SDHC/SDXC
Storage included None
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMI Yes (mini HDMI)
Wireless Optional
Wireless notes WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter
Remote control Yes (Optional)
Physical
Environmentally sealed No
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description EN-EL14a lithium-ion battery and charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 700
Weight (inc. batteries) 430 g (0.95 lb / 15.17 oz)
Dimensions 124 x 98 x 76 mm (4.88 x 3.86 x 2.99)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording No
GPS Optional
GPS notes GP-1

Reviews

DPReview Conclusion

Scoring is relative only to the other cameras in the same category at the time of review.

Score Breakdown
Poor Excellent
Build quality
Ergonomics & handling
Features
Metering & focus accuracy
Image quality (raw)
Image quality (jpeg)
Low light / high ISO performance
Viewfinder / screen rating
Performance
Movie / video mode
Value
Silver Award
Silver Award
77 %
Overall Score

The Nikon D3300 is an entry-level DSLR with an impressive spec list, including a 24 megapixel sensor and 1080/60p HD video recording. It provides the right level of controls for a beginner, offers a number of in-camera retouch options, and boasts excellent battery life.

Good For

A beginner specifically looking for a DSLR experience who may want to eventually take a little control over shooting settings.

Not So Good For

User Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
  • Lightpath48, Aug 26, 2014 GMT:
    Moving back was actually a move forward.

    I've owned a number of Nikon DSLRs, including D70, D50, D80, D5000 and D5100. In 2011 I switched to a Fujifilm X10 for compactness and portability. Later I bought a Fujifilm X-S1 to complement the X10 with a 24-264mm range. A few weeks ago I stumbled upon some very good D3300 images, and it piqued my interest. I downloaded some raw images from a review site, and processed them with ViewNX2. They were stunning! I'm a week into my D3300 experience as an owner.  I have the 18-55 VR II kit lens ...

    Continue Reading

Videos

Questions & Answers

QUESTION

Panaramic mode on d3300

Hi, how easy or hard is s the pano mode to use and what size prints will the pano mode produce. thanks for your help Bob

Fire02 asked
4 days ago

ANSWERS

QUESTION

Night shooting w/Nikon D3300

Hello, so I just got a D3300 and went downtown to do some night shooting and to my chagrin I was unable to see a preview of exposure changes while in live view under normal shooting operation. Not to mention the fact that I can't change aperture settings while in live view, but I realize the hardware limitation there. I can switch to manual movie mode and that will show exposure changes but then it wont allow me to reduce down below a 1/30th shutter speed. My problem is that when shooting a dark subject I need to be able to see it in order to focus on it. The trick I found that helps is that I can switch to movie mode, and crank up the ISO, then digizoom in and focus, then turn the ISO back down to a reasonable level, turn the movie mode off so that I can now reduce the shutter speed down so that I can have proper exposure. However annoying that may be, it works... unless the subject is super dim. I was just trying to get a shot of my car in super dim light and even with the shutter ...

conradcliff asked
3 months ago

ANSWERS

Right. Nikon don't do that. It's not really intended for use with live view. It has lousy live view. Use the viewfinder. Well, if the shutter speed is longer than 1/30th it won't be able to shoot 30 frames per second. It's too dark to see through the viewfinder? That seems like it's too dark to take a picture. Use the viewfinder. It's that window over the LCD display. Continue Reading

Leonard Migliore answered
3 months ago

Leonard, to my knowledge the viewfinder does not show exposure changes and therefore would not allow me to see my subject for focusing. And yes, I understand why it can't go below 1/30th in movie mode. I believe one of the reasons why I have the option of decreasing my shutter speed is to take photos of dimly lit subjects. I can take the same photo with my friends T3i so I don't know how you can definitively say that it's too dark to take a picture when you can't see it through the viewfinder. Why would you try to make rules that stifle creativity? Additionally, the digital zoom doesn't work with the viewfinder so getting crisp focus on distant subjects is more difficult, especially for a beginner like me. You're reply wasn't constructive in the least. Continue Reading

conradcliff answered
3 months ago

Leonard, to my knowledge the viewfinder does not show exposure changes and therefore would not allow me to see my subject for focusing. And yes, I understand why it can't go below 1/30th in movie mode. I believe one of the reasons why I have the option of decreasing my shutter speed is to take photos of dimly lit subjects. I can take the same photo with my friends T3i so I don't know how you can definitively say that it's too dark to take a picture when you can't see it through the viewfinder. Why would you try to make rules that stifle creativity? Additionally, the digital zoom doesn't work with the viewfinder so getting crisp focus on distant subjects is more difficult, especially for a beginner like me. You're reply wasn't constructive in the least. Hey? What if we started a petition to get Nikon to make a firmware update to show exposure changes in liveview apart from movie mode? That's a dumb idea isn't it? Continue Reading

conradcliff answered
3 months ago

QUESTION

What is the best camera for a visually-impaired photographer?

Hello, guys and gals! I am thinking about buying a DSLR/mirrorless camera and I need your help in choosing one. If I had to describe my vision problem, I would say that normal vision is like a long telephoto lens, while my eyes are wide-angle primes. I see everything much smaller than people with normal vision, but colors and focus/sharpness are not a problem. I would like to find a camera more suited for me, but it also MUST be a good interchangeable-lens camera, I won't buy another compact again. I bought the Fujifilm FinePix S4000 2 years ago and I only like one thing about it: its looong zoom (one of the longest at the time, equiv. to 700mm+ on a FF.) Image quality is bad even in good light, white balance and focus are terrible in low light. I went for a cheaper "superzoom" and I regretted not buying a DSLR. I compose using both the LCD screen and the EVF, since I rely on autofocus and I see well enough to frame the picture. However, it would be nice if I had a larger viewfinder. ...

6 months ago

ANSWERS

Viewfinders have three ratings: Magnification, coverage, and crop factor. The image size is: Magnification * coverage / crop factor If you want a big image, you want a low crop factor. Full frame is the way to go. If you cannot do full frame, a decent EVF will beat even the nicest APS OVFs. A Sony A77 viewfinder has a magnification of 0.72x. For comparison, a D7100 is 0.61x. A 70D is 0.59x, and only 95% coverage. An A6000 is 0.70x. I have good vision, and I really don't enjoy using APS OVFs all that much, even on the very high end. If you step down to a 100D or a D3200, the OVFs are painfully bad -- 0.54x and 0.5x respectively with 95% coverage. On the Sony end, I would look much more at the A-mount than E-mount. A-mount lens options are probably better in your price range than Canon/Nikon, at least if you want image stabilization. Wide aperture primes on A-mount all become stabilized. That's super-nice. Continue Reading

Alphoid answered
6 months ago

Difficult to say what you need to assist you with using a camera, but I cam across the following for videography. It clips over the lcd screen on your camera and magnifies the display a little. Might be worth visiting a store somewhere to try one out. I've only seen one on a canon camera, but am sure they are available for other makes and models.. http://paulmichaelegan.wordpress.com/2012/02/05/2-8x-lcd-view-finder-viewer-extender-v2-for-canon-550d-nikon-d90/ Hope that helps a little! Continue Reading

cnw180 answered
6 months ago

Thanks. I've seen a video of something like that on Youtube. But I'd probably end up not using it because it makes the camera so much bigger. Maybe a magnified eyepiece would be better? http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/387769-REG/Nikon_4793_DK_17M_Magnifying_Eyepiece_for.html Continue Reading

wideangleprime answered
6 months ago

Warranty Information

"No registration or "warranty" card is included or needed with a Nikon D-SLR or Coolpix camera. Keep your original, dated proof of purchase from the Authorized Nikon Inc. dealer in case warranty service is ever needed. These products do include either a mail-in form or a paper with a web link to our registration page:
https://support.nikonusa.com/app/product_registration
It's advised to register your product with Nikon so that we can send you information about future updates or service issues that may arise.


Nikkor lenses come with a standard one year warranty and Nikon Inc. lenses sold by authorized Nikon Inc. dealers will have a Nikon Inc. Five Year Extension. To register for the five year extension, one copy of the included form must be mailed in as indicated. Keep the Customer copy of the form as well as the original proof of purchase (sales receipt)."


Read the full warranty.

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