Nikon D5200 DSLR Camera

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79% Silver Award
Overall the D5200 is perfectly pleasant and capable little SLR, which is nice to use, delivers great results and offers a specification that wouldn't have looked out of place on a top-end SLR only a few years ago.”

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Key Features

  • 24MP DX-format CMOS sensor
  • 39-point (9 cross type) dynamic area AF system with 3D tracking
  • Up to 5 frames per second continuous shooting
  • 1080p 30FPS HD video (1080p, 60i) with full-time contrast-detect AF
  • ISO 100-6400, expandable to 25,600 equivalent
  • 3 inch vari-angle LCD with 921,000 dots
  • Wi-Fi (for sharing and remote camera control) and GPS compatible (sold separately)

Product Description

The Nikon D5200 is an upper entry-level DSLR that improves on the D5100 by offering a 24MP CMOS sensor, 1080p at 30FPS movie capability, a side-articulated 921K dot 3" tilt/swivel LCD and new processing filters. The D5200 is also equipped with a significantly upgraded AF system, based around the same Multi-Cam 4800DX AF sensor that is used in the D7000, and the same 2016-pixel RGB metering sensor. The D5200 is also compatible with Nikon's optional WU-1b WiFi module. You also have the option of taking full control over all exposure values while shooting video - aperture, shutter speed and ISO - in M mode, or letting the camera set the latter two for you.

Reviews

User Reviews

4.25 out of 5 stars
  • ARC, Dec 31, 2012 GMT:
    Nikon D5200 first hands on impressions

    Just received new D5200 today body only from Amazon UK- using it with Nikon 35mm 1.8 mm lens and is a good combination. Fast quiet and light weight. The autofocus is quick to lock on and flash is well balanced with minimal overexposures. So far only playing about with camera inside but will try it out on New Year's Day outside. Not a big video user but it works quickly and takes good videos with reasonable sound Reminds me of the D7000 but lighter weight and hinged LCD is useful and ...

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  • Scottelly, Dec 19, 2012 GMT:
    Logical Next Step, But Wish It Would Have Weather Seals

    Like the others who have rated/reviewed this camera before it has actually shipped, meaning that the review is based on specs and sample images posted by Nikon or some other company, I have to say that my "review" is based on the fact that I am expecting this camera to retail for $1,000 at launch (probably $995 or $899 on the street). With that in mind, if it comes on the market for a couple hundred dollars less than that, I would give it an extra star. Like other people here, I have not ...

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  • NIKON5200, Dec 10, 2012 GMT:
    Advantages of the Nikon D5200--Nikon D90

    Advantages of the Nikon D5200 True resolution Much higher true resolution 24 MP vs 12.2 MP Help Capture around 2x more detail in your photos Movie format Higher resolution movies 1080p @ 30fps vs 720p @ 24fps Help Shoots higher resolution Full HD (1080p) video at a higher frame rate Focus points Many more focus points 39 vs 11 Help Set focus accurately within the frame External mic jack Has an external mic jack Yes vs No Help Record high quality audio with an external microphone Cross ...

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  • a43anshi, Nov 12, 2012 GMT:
    image quality

    image quality is excellent,

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Questions & Answers

QUESTION

Canon 70D versus Nikon D5200 Image Quality

I'm considering these two cameras for purchase to take and print (24 by 36 inches) landscape photos with ultra wide lens (20 mm or less 35 mm equivalent). Would the raw and jpeg out of each camera give me roughly equal image quality?

5th street asked
3 months ago

ANSWERS

I would imagine it's because the differences you're referring to will be unnoticeable in the printed product. Like most such differences between current cameras, they are only relevant to the numbers-obsessed on these forums, and make no difference to the actual images these cameras produce. Continue Reading

3 months ago

I have found that 2 extra stops DR can come in quite handy for landscape work.....not just the numbers obsessed. Continue Reading

Dave Luttmann answered
3 months ago

I know you didn't ask about it, but I'd also add the Canon 6D to your list of options.  The FF sensor will be ideal for landscape shots, especially in lower light situations (dawn, sunset). Continue Reading

Joe Pa answered
3 months ago

QUESTION

Best two lenses solution for Nikon D7100 / D5200

So I have a Nikon D7100, and want to carry only two objectives. I use the camera for group settings, indoors sports and portraits. NOT for macro and landscape. Because of indoors sports, I need a fast lens that can zoom to some extent. Due to less-than-ideal lighting inside a sports hall, keeping low aperture is also preferable on an APS C. I also want a high quality lens to portray motives as detailed as possible. [1] Sigma 35mm F/1.4 + Sigma 17-70mm F/2.8-4 + Prime offers ultimate image quality at its range + 17-70mm lens very fast - F4.0 aperture at 70mm - Somewhat weak at wide-angle [2] Sigma 18-35 F/1.8 + Sigma 50-150mm F/2.8 + Strong at wide-angle + Longer range - Noticeably worse image quality at 35mm (???) - 50-150 slower and less detailed at 50-70mm range (???) As I've put question marks behind the latter two points, it is pretty much what I want to know. Can the 18-35mm zoom lens compete with the prime lens at 35mm at all? Being more expensive, is the quality and speed of ...

ontheverge asked
4 months ago

ANSWERS

#2 - nothing to discuss with the D7100 IMHO. The Sigma  35/1.4 isn't that fantastic on the D7100, and you need to go beyond 100 mm for sports.  Many users also note that the Sigma 50-150/2.8 is very well suited for portraiture, I haven't used it for that so far, but the rendering and bokeh is very very good, for sure. Limitations/caveats: * Not sure of focussing speed of 18-35/1.8 for action. But for allround use, it is adequate. * Those are big and heavy lenses! You might want something like a 18-105 Nikkor for walkaround use.  I had the non-VC Tamron 17-50/2.8 before getting the 18-35/1.8, and I still use it a lot. * Wide angle is not covered well. For your use, the Samyang 16/2 might be a good complement, I have the 11-16/2.8 Tokina and it works well, but still I contemplate the new  Samyang - both for speed and performance @16mm. * You will want something longer and faster and smaller to complement. Nikkors 50/1.8 and 85/1.8 are obvious candidates.  The 85/1.8 on the D7100 ... Continue Reading

SNRatio answered
3 months ago

It will help to state the size of the groups (2-3 people or 20-30) and the type of sports and how close you can get. For more comments, see your private messages. msc Continue Reading

msc1 answered
4 months ago

Have you looked at the new Nikon 18-140? The problem with the Sigma 17-70 is that you'll have to step down the aperture if you want sharp images.  And if you do that, then it's really not any faster than most other lenses.  And yeah, at 17mm it is somewhat soft, regardless of aperture. Continue Reading

Escape answered
4 months ago

QUESTION

No aperture while recording video on some Nikon DSRL cameras: is this really a problem?

This is a question for practicing videographers owning and using Nikon D3200, D5200, D7100, D600 cameras. I was experimenting with the D5200 for a couple of hours during a Nikon show and I liked it very much. Before the show, I had watched and read reviews about the video capabilities of Nikon DSLR cameras, so I was aware of the limitation that the aperture cannot be changed during recording video; if you want to change the aperture, you have to stop video recording, switch to viewfinder mode, change the aperture, switch back to live view mode, and restart video recording. This sounds very awkward, but actually, even though my mirrorless Nikon V1 is capable, I never changed the aperture during recording videos. I'd like to hear your practicing videographers opinion: was/is this limitation of Nikon DSLR cameras really a problem in your experience/projects? The reason I am asking is that I am thinking of buying a Nikon D5300, mostly for my video projects, and I guess, the D5300 will ...

Miki Nemeth asked
6 months ago

ANSWERS

It's not a serious limitation for any of the video I've been involved in (short film productions) most shots are fairly short in length before you cut away and you would never change aperture (at least significantly) in the middle of a shot.  It is a slight annoyance between shots that you have to leave and re-enter LV to change aperture. If it's a significant limitation, get a de-clicked/cine lens. There are lots of great manual lenses or Samyang/Rokinon makes a few as well. You can also use a variable ND filter to adjust exposure.  The 1/3 stop that the camera normally lets you adjust aperture is too coarse and is often noticeable anyway. Continue Reading

sshoihet answered
6 months ago

Miki Nemeth wrote: This is a question for practicing videographers owning and using Nikon D3200, D5200, D7100, D600 cameras. I was experimenting with the D5200 for a couple of hours during a Nikon show and I liked it very much. Before the show, I had watched and read reviews about the video capabilities of Nikon DSLR cameras, so I was aware of the limitation that the aperture cannot be changed during recording video; if you want to change the aperture, you have to stop video recording, switch to viewfinder mode, change the aperture, switch back to live view mode, and restart video recording. This sounds very awkward, but actually, even though my mirrorless Nikon V1 is capable, I never changed the aperture during recording videos. I'd like to hear your practicing videographers opinion: was/is this limitation of Nikon DSLR cameras really a problem in your experience/projects? The reason I am asking is that I am thinking of buying a Nikon D5300, mostly for my video projects, and I ... Continue Reading

TimBrandt answered
6 months ago

Miki Nemeth wrote: This is a question for practicing videographers owning and using Nikon D3200, D5200, D7100, D600 cameras. I was experimenting with the D5200 for a couple of hours during a Nikon show and I liked it very much. Before the show, I had watched and read reviews about the video capabilities of Nikon DSLR cameras, so I was aware of the limitation that the aperture cannot be changed during recording video; if you want to change the aperture, you have to stop video recording, switch to viewfinder mode, change the aperture, switch back to live view mode, and restart video recording. This sounds very awkward, but actually, even though my mirrorless Nikon V1 is capable, I never changed the aperture during recording videos. I'd like to hear your practicing videographers opinion: was/is this limitation of Nikon DSLR cameras really a problem in your experience/projects? The reason I am asking is that I am thinking of buying a Nikon D5300, mostly for my video projects, and I ... Continue Reading

mistermejia answered
6 months ago

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WHAT'S IN THE BOX?

  • D5200 Camera Body
  • Lens kit includes either AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-105mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR OR AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR Lens
  • EN-EL14 Rechargeable Li-ion Battery
  • MH-24 Quick Charger
  • DK-20 Rubber Eyecup
  • UC-E17 USB Cable
  • EG-CP16 Audio Video Cable
  • AN-DC3 Camera Strap
  • DK-5 Eyepiece Cap
  • BF-1B Body Cap
  • BS-1 Accessory Shoe Cover
  • Nikon ViewNX 2 CD-ROM

Warranty Information

"No registration or "warranty" card is included or needed with a Nikon D-SLR or Coolpix camera. Keep your original, dated proof of purchase from the Authorized Nikon Inc. dealer in case warranty service is ever needed. These products do include either a mail-in form or a paper with a web link to our registration page:
https://support.nikonusa.com/app/product_registration
It's advised to register your product with Nikon so that we can send you information about future updates or service issues that may arise.


Nikkor lenses come with a standard one year warranty and Nikon Inc. lenses sold by authorized Nikon Inc. dealers will have a Nikon Inc. Five Year Extension. To register for the five year extension, one copy of the included form must be mailed in as indicated. Keep the Customer copy of the form as well as the original proof of purchase (sales receipt)."


Read the full warranty.

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