Rokinon 35mm F/1.4 Aspherical UMC Lens

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Key Features

  • 35mm focal length
  • 52.5mm equivalent focal length on APS-C cameras, 70mm equivalent focal length on Four Thirds / Micro Four Thirds cameras, 56mm equivalent focal length on Canon APS-C cameras
  • F1.4 maximum aperture; F22 minimum
  • Manual focus only
  • 77mm filters
  • 0.30m/11.81" minimum focus
  • Available in Canon EF, Nikon F (FX), Four Thirds, Pentax KAF, Sony Alpha, Samsung NX mounts

Product Description

Sophisticated optics of Samyang 35 mm F1.4 UMC has been constructed upon twelve elements arranged in ten groups. The lens comes with two lenses made of the glass with high refraction factor, which reduces its weight and dimensions. Moreover, one aspherical lens minimizes the risk of chromatic aberration. Owing to the high-quality multi-layer coatings, our lens provides high contrast and faithful color imaging. Samyang 35 mm f/1.4 AS UMC uses the system of the so called “floating” lenses allowing to preserve high image quality with minimum focusing distance.

Specs

Principal specifications
Lens type Prime lens
Max Format size 35mm FF
Focal length 35 mm
Image stabilisation No
Lens mount Canon EF, Nikon F (FX), Four Thirds, Pentax KAF, Sony Alpha, Sony E (NEX), Samsung NX
Aperture
Maximum aperture F1.4
Minimum aperture F22.0
Aperture ring Yes
Optics
Elements 12
Groups 10
Special elements / coatings 2 high-refraction glass elements 1 aspherical element
Focus
Minimum focus 0.30 m (11.81)
Autofocus No
Full time manual Unknown
Distance scale Yes
DoF scale Yes
Physical
Weight 660 g (1.46 lb)
Diameter 63 mm (2.48)
Length 112 mm (4.39)
Filter thread 77 mm
Tripod collar No

Reviews

User Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
  • UndeadHunter, Jan 8, 2013 GMT:
    This lens is brilliant

    I have this lens as well as the 14mm 2.8 both in Nikon mount and and thrilled with them. Optically they are great, not just for the price but they are great at any price. Build quality is great as is the cpu coupling which works to interface with the lens, including focus indication. Bokhe is nice, DOF tiny wide open. Manual focus is the reason for buying this. Having become annoyed how the current range of AF lens manually focus, these lenses are like precision engineering. Slow, direct ...

    Continue Reading

  • UndeadHunter, Jan 8, 2013 GMT:
    This lens out performs lenses three or five times the price.

    I have this lens as well as the 14mm 2.8 both in Nikon mount and and thrilled with them. Optically they are great, not just for the price but they are great at any price. Build quality is great as is the cpu coupling which works to interface with the lens, including focus indication. Bokhe is nice, DOF tiny wide open. Manual focus is the reason for buying this. Having become annoyed how the current range of AF lens manually focus, these lenses are like precision engineering. Slow, direct ...

    Continue Reading

  • UndeadHunter, Jan 8, 2013 GMT:
    This lens out performs lenses three or five times the price.

    I have this lens as well as the 14mm 2.8 both in Nikon mount and and thrilled with them. Optically they are great, not just for the price but they are great at any price. Build quality is great as is the cpu coupling which works to interface with the lens, including focus indication. Bokhe is nice, DOF tiny wide open. Manual focus is the reason for buying this. Having become annoyed how the current range of AF lens manually focus, these lenses are like precision engineering. Slow, direct ...

    Continue Reading

Videos

Sample Video Footage FIlmed with the Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 Lens

Questions & Answers

QUESTION

Err on Nikon D800 when switching to LiveView

While I rely on my Sony A900 bodies and Minolta/Sony lenses for stills, I got a Nikon D800 when it came out. D800's main-sensor LiveView and clean video (that I use with Atomos Ninja 2) without any pellicle mirror were compelling enough to diversify the lens mounts. While I am super-happy with my first Nikon camera, to my amazement in some situations it locks up and shows Err. In all my years of using Minolta film and Sony digital slrs, with manual lenses etc., none of then have ever locked up once. I've opened the case with Nikon but as they are investigated, I wanted to consult with real Nikon users in the field. How the problem happens: when I switch my D800 to LiveView mode (either photo or video variety), 3 times out of 4 on average, it would for a split-second begin showing the LiveView picture but then the screen would go black and the top LCD would start flashing Err. By pressing the shutter to clear this condition and trying again, I can usually get it to work, but it takes ...

Alec asked
11 months ago

ANSWERS

ironically, there is a thread running on this forum with just that problem! worth a read.. http://www.dpreview.com/forums/post/52069863 Continue Reading

Alan Brown answered
11 months ago

All manual focus lenses (like the Samyang) have to be set to the smallest aperture and locked there. This will probably solve your problem. If not, try with another, preferably AF, lens, Continue Reading

mibadt answered
11 months ago

Michael, Thanks very much for replying. Are you suggesting I can't have DOF control with Nikon D800 and manual lenses? I've tried at varying apertures - it seems to lock up wide open or fully stopped down or everything in between. AF is utterly useless to me for macro or video. Video lenses have the gearing on the barrels that mate directly with follow focus, and other video specific features that I can't substitute in Nikon AF glass. The one Nikkor I have, 60/2.8 macro, locks up in manual focus mode just like non-contact lenses. The question I would like to understand completely is whether a), b) or c) is the case: a) I am doing something stupid - I *CANNOT* believe I am the only one using D800 with cine lenses of which there are plenty being sold in Nikon mount and none of which have auto focusing or electronic lens contacts: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ns=p_PRICE_2%7c1&ci=1884&N=4028759430+4237293402&srtclk=sort These lenses tend not to "breathe" (zoom) when you rack ... Continue Reading

Alec answered
11 months ago

QUESTION

Nikon D600 best budget configuration for portrait videography?

As my name suggests i am a pro videographer.However i' am ignorant in terms of photography and lenses with the exception of camcorders (i currently own a panasonic AG-HPX250 P2 and a Canon xf305). Recently my girlfriend bought a nikon d600 body and looks for affordable lenses under 1000 euros to use it mainly for videography. Personal i consider the following lenses: 1)Samyang 35mm T1.5 AS UMC VDSLR (500 euros) 2) Carl Zeiss Planar T* 1.4/50 ZF.2 50mm F1.4 - Nikon Mount (800euros) or both if i buy it from a Hong Kong shop (both under 1000 euros) I would like to buy a Carl Zeiss Distagon T however in my country is priced around 2000 euros (0r 1480 in HK) and therefore it is out of question. Finally, i am considering a Nikon AF-S 50mm f1.4G (400euros) instead of Carl Zeiss Planar T. How do you think they will perform especially in portrait videography ? Do you have any others suggestions from other brands (eg. Tokina)? Kind Regards (and sorry for my poor English) Dinos

1 year ago

ANSWERS

Hello Dino; I have the D600 and I use it for videography too. So far I have not invested in a dedicated "cine" lens although the research I am doing to educate myself on the nuisances of cine photography all point to the need of a manual lens. So far I have made Video's on D600 using 50 1.8g and 85 1.8g. The video come out great however, when using auto focus with video you loose control of the focus. Sometimes the focus grabs on the nearest subject. I have not yet had an opportunity to put the lens in manual mode to record video. I would also recommend that you invest in the following two items. Nikon ME-1 Microphone http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/764279-REG/Nikon_27045_ME_1_Stereo_Microphone_with.html Manfrotto Video monopod http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/737980-REG/Manfrotto_561BHDV_1_Fluid_Video_Monopod_W_Head.html The monopod makes a tremendous difference in your video recording. I cannot believe the difference in recording clarity when using a monopod versus ... Continue Reading

Teak answered
1 year ago

I am waiting for my D600 to arrive. I will be using it quite a bit for video. I read a lot about the Samyang 35mm f/1.4 but finally decided to go for the nikon 28mm f/1.8 because of comparatively smaller size and weight. I still think the Samyang is a better video lens but the weight (almost 700 g, same weight as the D600 body itself) put me off because I have to carry my equipment around. I went for the Nikon 28mm because of its suitable video focal length and small size. Continue Reading

Sajid213 answered
1 year ago

First i would like to thank you all for your responses and your suggestions. As far as it concerns the equipment  I already have monopods and tripods (2 vinten and a couple of  manfrottos) along with a Merlin stabilizer. Now in relation to the sound equipment i only have xlr mics so we are considering either to buy a beachtek audio adapter (which i can find from  online UK stores) or wait the new VideoMic HD which is based on NTG3 technology (even though  from the pictures i don't appreciate  the construction, i already have a rode NTG 3 and i know how  amazing it is). Returning to the initial question i would like to know if anyone has the samyang (or the equivalent rokinon etc) and if anyone has an suggestion on the particular Carl Zeiss model that i am willing to buy; Continue Reading

ProVideographer answered
1 year ago

QUESTION

Which would you choose? Primes vs. Zooms

I'm a new videographer who just purchased most of my gear, except the lenses. I have a Canon 5dmkii with a Canon 55mm f/1.8 After reading lots of reviews and recommendations I've narrowed down the field to some third party lenses I'm considering going in on. At this point my budget is roughly $600-$900, so that puts me at either one zoom lens or two primes. For zooms I'm looking at the:Tamron 24-70 f/2.8 ( image stabilization) vs the Canon 24-70 f/2.8 (with no IS). I've also heard mixed reviews about the Canon 24-105 f/4 because it has such a large range but it is a bit slow. There is a huge thread discussing the Tamron 24-70 f/2.8 at the moment, but it seems users are going both ways on it. For primes I would buy a single wide lens, and a single portrait lens about 85mm. Wide: Rokinon 35mm f/1.4 vs Samyang 35mm f/1.4 Portrait: Rokin 85mm f/1.4 vs Samyang 85mm f/1.4 I plan on mainly shooting video: documentary interviews, b-roll, short films, etc. What do you guys prefer, zoom or ...

3 months ago

ANSWERS

Some of the Nikon F to  Canon EF adapters fit a little loosely. Look for the adapters that have a leaf spring - these fit well. Fotodiox Pro adapter (~$70.00) works very well, Bower adaptor (without the leaf spring) is loose. I use a Nikkor AIS 50mm f/1.2 as my normal prime - nice lens. Continue Reading

NancyP answered
3 months ago

If you are going to do video and considering non-AF lenses anyways; I would seriously look at Adapter+Nikon F-mount old Nikkor lenses.  You can pick one up for ridiculously cheap; you can follow the online instructions on how to remove the "f-stop clicks" so you get basically a cine-lens style no stop aperture.  You can probably pick up a Nikkor 50mm F1.8 AIS for $20.  I am sure if you swim around evil-bay you can pick up old Nikkor lenses in those desired focal lengths for pennies on the dollar. I was in Singapore a few months ago; and a tv station was filming there.  I walked over there to see what they were "filming" with.  Canon 7D + adapter + Nikkor 50mm F1.2.  I talked to the guy, only lens he has.  Shoots every single on location with that combo.  They filmed and then watched the review right away to see if they needed another take.  The combo worked amazingly well. So it's a cheap(er) alternative and suggestion if you haven't considered it.  If I was doing video; even though ... Continue Reading

Albert answered
3 months ago

Just a quick FYI. Rokinon/Samyang are the same lenses. Samyang is the Korean company and Rokinon is one of the names it sells its lenses under. Other brands they use are listed here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samyang_Optics I have heard great stuff about the 85mm in particular and Samyang lenses in general. Never owned any though because they are fully manual lenses. While this would be great on a mirrorless camera due to things like focus-peaking and the WYSIWYG nature of EVFs, it's not ideal on a DSLR in my opinion. The trade-off though is you get excellent optical quality and mechanical reliability at a really low price, weight and size. On the general video recommendation front, sorry but I don't shoot enough of it to weigh in. Continue Reading

Pritzl answered
3 months ago
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