Sony NEX-5T Mirrorless Camera

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Key Features

  • 16MP APS-C format CMOS sensor
  • Fast Hybrid AF includes phase-detection for DSLR-like focus
  • Up to 10 fps shooting speed
  • ISO 100-25600
  • 3" tilting touch-LCD with 920,000 dots
  • Full 1080 HD movie shooting at 60p/24p with full exposure control
  • Simple connectivity to smartphones via Wi-Fi or NFC
  • One-touch sharing: Directly transfers a still image or movie to an NFC enabled Android smartphone or tablet with a single touch.
  • One-touch remote: Activates Smart Remote Control and links the camera with a smartphone or tablet by simply touching the devices while in a shooting mode
  • Optional electronic viewfinder

Product Description

The 16MP Sony NEX-5T is marginally updated from its predecessor, with the addition of NFC connectivity. It has a control dial, dedicated function button and the ability to run proprietary in-camera apps to extend its capabilities. It retains its predecessor's live view focusing technology, using a modified sensor with pixels devoted to performing phase-detection to provide a hybrid autofocus system. The phase-detection pixels are used to determine depth information about the focus target, which means the camera has to perform less hunting. Other key features includes its 180° tilt-able touch-screen LCD for easy self-portraits, DSLR-like AF tracking for shooting at up to 10 fps, one-touch sharing, and one-touch remote (for NFC-enabled devices).

Specs

Body type
Body type Rangefinder-style mirrorless
Sensor
Max resolution 4912 x 3264
Other resolutions 4912 x 2760, 3568 x 2368, 3568 x 2000, 2448 x 1624, 2448 x 1376
Image ratio w:h 3:2, 16:9
Effective pixels 16 megapixels
Sensor photo detectors 17 megapixels
Sensor size APS-C (23.4 x 15.6 mm)
Sensor type CMOS
Processor Bionz
Image
ISO Auto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800, 25600
White balance presets 6
Custom white balance Yes
Image stabilization No
Uncompressed format RAW
JPEG quality levels Fine, Standard
Optics & Focus
Autofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Digital zoom No
Manual focus Yes
Number of focus points 25
Lens mount Sony E (NEX)
Focal length multiplier 1.5×
Screen / viewfinder
Articulated LCD Tilting
Screen size 3
Screen dots 921,600
Touch screen Yes
Screen type Tilt Up 180° Down 50° TFT LCD
Live view Yes
Viewfinder type Electronic (optional)
Photography features
Minimum shutter speed 30 sec
Maximum shutter speed 1/4000 sec
Aperture priority Yes
Shutter priority Yes
Manual exposure mode Yes
Subject / scene modes Yes
Built-in flash No
Flash range 7.00 m (ISO100)
External flash Yes (Accessory Port (supplied))
Flash modes Auto, On, Off, Red-Eye, Slow Sync, Rear Curtain, Fill-in
Continuous drive 10.0 fps
Self-timer Yes ((10/2 sec. delay), Self-timer (Cont.) (with 10 sec. delay; 3/5 exposures))
Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation ±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)
AE Bracketing (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 2/3 EV steps)
WB Bracketing No
Videography features
Format MPEG-4, AVCHD, H.264
Microphone Stereo
Speaker Mono
Storage
Storage types SD/ SDHC/SDXC, Memory Stick Pro Duo/ Pro-HG Duo
Storage included None
Connectivity
USB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)
HDMI Yes (Mini Type C)
Wireless Built-In
Wireless notes NFC and WiFi
Remote control No
Physical
Environmentally sealed No
Battery Battery Pack
Battery description Lithium-Ion NPFW50 rechargeable battery & charger
Battery Life (CIPA) 330
Weight (inc. batteries) 276 g (0.61 lb / 9.74 oz)
Dimensions 111 x 59 x 39 mm (4.36 x 2.31 x 1.53)
Other features
Orientation sensor Yes
Timelapse recording No
GPS None

Questions & Answers

QUESTION

Nikon V1 as a wildlife camera?

Hi I've been using my NEX-5R with 70-400 recently for wildlife shots - most of which need a lot of cropping. Optical quality is reasonably good but the body is not designed for this type of work and so buffer depth and other handling apects are frustrating I had been thinking of getting a Sony SLT-A77 (though the high ISO noise worries me) but the Nikon 1 V1 is going for a crazy-cheap price locally and I have a rather nice Pentax F*300/4.5 lens which I wonder about using on it via an Ebay adaptor - this would certainly be a cheaper option than the A77, but would it be a realistic one? Specs for the V1 seem exciting (able to take photos and videos at the same time) but I see that it doesn't have focus peaking and people complain about the image magnification for MF. I would be buying just the body and kit 10-30 lens, and am not interested in buying any Nikon telephoto lenses to go with it 1. Will a cropped bird image on the V1 be similar, superior or inferior to a similarly cropped ...

9 months ago

ANSWERS

Here is a set on Flickr showing some shots I have  taken with the Nikon 70-300 VR lens on my V1 with the FT1 adapter: http://www.flickr.com/photos/thekrankis/sets/72157637421120234/ I you decide to go the Nikon 1 route I would advise using Nikon lenses, since the recent firmware update many third party lenses that used to  work with the FT1 now do not. The 70-300 VR that I use is an affordable starting place and gives an equivalent 190-810 reach. The 300 f4 lens is popular and gives superb results. Also the 70-200 f4 and the 70-200 f2.8 lenses perform very well - the f4 is probably more suitable simply because it is smaller and lighter. Have fun whatever you decide! Continue Reading

Sonyshine answered
9 months ago

Yes, here is one taken with the V1 and a Nikon 300f4 (with 1.4TC). I think the goal with the V1 is to NOT crop. IQ isn't going to be as good as that from larger, recent sensors. The 2.7x crop factor, coupled with ability to do (accurate) central-point autofocus makes the V1 and V2 uniquely capable for doing certain wildlife shots. Namely those with a) decent to bright light and b) non-moving subjects. This thumbnail shot is uncropped: Nikon V1, FT-1 adapter, Nikon 300F4 AF-S with Nikon 1.4 TC. Here is a link to the large size version of the above: http://www.cjcphoto.net/lenstests/v1/images/130306-175446-00-2448-1%20v1.jpg Here is the same bird, without the 1.4TC (bare 300mm lens) but cropped in to about the same composition as the above so you can compare with and without the TC: http://www.cjcphoto.net/lenstests/v1/images/130306-175651-00-2458-1%20v1-crop.jpg The problem with moving subjects is twofold.  First, you have only a single (largish) central autofocus point/area.   If ... Continue Reading

PHXAZCRAIG answered
9 months ago

The V2 has a 60fps mode. I've been shooting him for 5 years now. I suspect he'll be out there again in a week or so, if not already. (This pair of owls returns to the same nest near my house every year). Hmm. I don't know that I would say that. I did, of course, have more pixels on the owl with the TC than without, so there is some advantage in that. But any difference you see may well be more due to post-processing than anything else. You can take photos at the same time, though they are lower resolution JPG's, as far as I know. I don't have any convenient way of posting videos, except in Facebook. Last spring I shot several videos of the owls (3 chicks and one adult in the nest until they got too big). I did it mostly for the grandchildren to see the chicks getting larger each week. I hardly ever do video, except underwater, but the experience brought home to me the possibility of using crop factor reach in a way that you can't match with a D800e, or D7100. If you have Facebook, ... Continue Reading

PHXAZCRAIG answered
9 months ago

QUESTION

A77II AF performance with MK1 70-400G?

Has anybody used the MK1 version of the 70-400G with the A77II? Does it speed up the often slightly slow AF performance of this lens?  Is it an improvement over the lens' AF performance when used with the original Mk1 A77? I use this lens for birding with my NEX-5R and LA-EA2 adaptor - horrible AF performance on that combination but investigations a while back suggested that the mk1 A77 would not be able to give me the AF I was looking for.  Now that the 7Dii has appeared I'm hoping there may be a few deals appearing for the A77II and any experience of the body and lens combo for my application would be much appreciated Thanks!

1 month ago

ANSWERS

I have the A77, A77II and 70-400G1. The 70-400G1 takes the same amount of time for the lens motor to shift all that glass and reach AF for A77 vs. A77II.  Only the SSM2 motor in the 70-400G2 would improve that. Yes the A77II will help you get a focus point on the BIF quicker and track the BIF better once AF is locked, but I don't think that is what you are asking.  It is the physical moving of the glass that you need to be quicker and that will need SSM2. Continue Reading

eddiewood answered
1 month ago

Hi Eddie Many thanks for your reply I'm not totally understanding.  Are you are saying that it won't get lock any faster but once it gets lock the tracking will be better? At the moment I have enormous problems as each time I press the shutter of a bird taking off the camera refuses to fire as the bird is 'no longer in focus' and I basically have to press the 'MF' button on the lens simultaneous to the shutter and hope the bird remains in focus (and that I press fast enough to capture it...  which normally I don't).  Would this situation resolve itself? Are you able to get BIF with this lens/body combo or is it still a near impossibility? I have the feeling you are slightly disappointed with the A77II and this lens in comparison to the A77 Mk1, is that correct? I would only be getting this body to use with the 70-400G lens - I can't afford to sell the lens and get the Mk2 version and the A77II.  It might be more sensible to sell the lens get a Canon 7D (original) and a Canon ... Continue Reading

parallaxproblem answered
1 month ago

I have both the 77 I &II and both 79/400s.  Initial acquisition has been improved with new chip and motor in the g2 lens (4x marketing claims).  The chip was developed originally for the 500f4 along with new motor.  Either camera will see significant improvement over your adapted body but on the mkII the lens really sings with micro adjusting as it keeps up with tracking.  As a side note, the 70/400 has gone from a medium focus speed (C grade) to a ( B- to B) very acceptable speed.  Is it the fastest lens in my collection, no but it can easily follow swallows if flight with both cameras, but especially with the MKII.  Hope this helps Continue Reading

steelhead3 answered
1 month ago

QUESTION

Inexpensive Sony NEX for a child

Hi! I have a 9 year old son who shows some interest in photography and videography. Would like to buy a cheap camera for him. Cheap because he will probably break it soon. But tough compacts are too expensive, even old ones, and their photo quality is too bad. I own a full Olympus m4/3 system and I gave him my old Olympus E-P3. It's a very well built camera, it doesn't break if you drop it on asphalt from 4 feet height. But, since it was 3.3 year old it recently stopped working. Shutter probably broke after 60000+ actuations. I would have bought him Olympus E-PM2 if it was on sale for $200 like it was earlier this year. I got 14-42mm m4/3 lens that is good enough for him. Or, I would buy any Panasonic camera for less than $300, but there aren't any, with sensor comparable to E-PM2. I won't buy a m4/3 camera with pre-2012 Panasonic sensor because low light shooting is important. Even though Panasonic has better video than Olympus. This leaves Sony NEX as the only alternative. It got ...

micksh6 asked
14 days ago

ANSWERS

Just a few weeks ago, I bought a camera for my son (same age as yours). I could buy a NEX-3 with the kit lens and the 16/2.8 for €150. Then, I sold both lenses separately for the same price as the whole kit was. So that is a free camera. Then I mounted an old and ugly Olympus pen-f 38/1.8 lens and handed the camera over to my son with the necessary instructions. Now he is really learning to take pictures the old fashioned way and he has a lot of fun. He brings in some very nice pictures too. Maybe you could do something like that and mount a cheap old lens, or just keep the standard zoom. A nice NEX-3/5 can be bought for little money. Continue Reading

zink answered
13 days ago

I wouldn't get a child an interchangeable lens camera.  It's too delicate and the sensor is fully exposed with the lens off.  I had a Sony 18-200 lens that was in my backpack on a rainy day and got condensation in the lens despite not getting directly wet - cost me $75 to have it stripped down and cleaned out. I think a camera like an Olympus Tough would be a good choice being shock-resistant and completely waterproof.  The TG-3 takes good quality photos. A child getting into photography should first learn about composition, develop an eye for seeing a good photograph.  Also, making sure the desired shot is in focus and exposed correctly by using focus-lock. Let the camera worry about the other technical details. Another option: I recently bought a Sony WX-350 for my wife for under $200.  20X optical zoom, G-class lens, tiny form factor. Either of these compacts are easily carryable in his school backpack, where the NEX would be too big.  The best camera is the one you have with you. ... Continue Reading

Ken Sills answered
14 days ago

I've met a few adults I wouldn't trust with a log:-) Continue Reading

13 days ago

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